Sunday, June 17, 2012

Graham Caflisch
Blog Post One
Thurston Woods
6/17/12


6/11/12

 On Monday of the first week of the Thurston Woods project my team; Nathan, Luke and I learned how to accurately record the dimensions of the second level of Janet Tyler’s home.  With the help of Jeffrey Klee we managed to record all the measurements necessary to accurately draw the floor plan in one afternoon.  The concept of drawing with string lines was introduced to us at this site and proved to be a quick and accurate approach toward recording interior dimensions.  Janet’s home was our first attempt at recording the mixed architectural style present throughout Thurston woods and promises to have some interesting conclusions in the weeks to come.

6/13/12
    
    On Wednesday of the first week my team and I traveled to the home of John and Mary Schmierer.  Here we found a house that fit very well into the post WWII Thurstonwood’s neighborhood.  What we thought would be another typical interior floor plan soon transformed into a site with huge potential as we walked around to the back of the house.  We found a garage that looked like it had been constructed with material that predated the construction of the house.  As we entered the garage we encountered a space that very clearly demonstrate the scope of our project.  The modest design of the garage clashed with the modern equipment that it housed giving us good information about the material culture of the neighborhood.  The garage was constructed with material that once served a different purpose.  The missing nails in a number of large holes in the roof’s decking is evidence for the adaptive reuse of the material.  This concept of re-use was amplified through the varying dimensions of the wooden studs that lined the perimeter of the garage.  The studs predate the dimensional lumber we see in construction projects today and included evidence of lath and machine cut nails.   The garage is a wonderful example of architectural expression during the late 1940s and will serve as precedent for the remainder of the project.