Syllabus


 Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School
Washington Park, Milwaukee, 2014

Project Partners and Co Sponsors
Washington Park Partners, Quorum Architects, My Next Generation, Express Yourself Milwaukee, Washington Park Library, Urban Ecology Center, Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and Madison, Office of Undergraduate Research, UWM, Historic Milwaukee Inc., Milwaukee Preservation Alliance, Inc. Wisconsin Humanities Council, Cultures and Communities, UWM.

Course
ARCH 534 Field Study. –3 cr.
ARCH 561 Measured Drawing for Architects. –3 cr.
ARCH 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory. –3 cr.
Arch 390: Independent studies for undergraduate students. –3 cr.

Contact Information:
Arijit Sen, senA@uwm.edu
Erin Dorbin, erindorbin@gmail.com
Bess Earl, bess.earl@umcs-wi.org
Maia Stack, mxstack@uwm.edu

Locations
June 2, 2014, REQUIRED daylong workshop, 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM, AUP 183, School of Architecture and Urban Planning Room 183
June 9 - 27, 2014, Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
June 13, 2014, CAD and Photography workshop, AUP 194, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM.
June 30 - July 11, 2014, AUP 183, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM.

Required Text:
Thomas C. Hubka, Houses without Names: Architectural Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses, Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2013.
Thomas Carter and Elizabeth C. Cromley, Invitation to Vernacular Architecture: A Guide to the Study of Ordinary Buildings and Landscapes, Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2005. ($14:00 - 24.00)
Valerie Yow. Recording Oral History: A Guide for the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2nd ed. Walnut Creek, CA: Altimira Press, 2005. ($18.00 - 30.00)

Course Description
This course provides you with an immersion experience in the field recording of the built environment and cultural landscapes and an opportunity to learn how to write history literally “from the ground up.” Classes and meetings will be held on site at the Washington Park Partners office and outdoors on site. Digital workshops, lab training and final project production work will be organized at the UWM campus in the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. Class will meet on weekdays from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM (except for community workshops and events on weekends listed below). Students will receive training on site documentation (including photography, buildings and landscapes (focusing on how to “read” buildings within its material, political, social, cultural and economic contexts), and primary source research (including oral history, archival research).

Learning objectives
This course is a fieldwork, skill building, research methods and application course. As a result students are expected to demonstrate an expert level of comprehension and learning in the following ways:
1.     Demonstrate an ability to collect information from the field.
2.     Demonstrate an advanced ability to interpret social and material evidence. Demonstrate an ability to read, evaluate, and interpret the built environment as cultural artifact; uncover the ideological and symbolic underpinnings of the material world.
3.     Demonstrate an ability to document and represent knowledge of the social and material aspects of cultural landscapes in visual and textual forms.

A unique field school
The BLC Field School project seeks to broaden and popularize historic preservation and ecological awareness in the City of Milwaukee and beyond.  We have carefully planned and executed a unique collaborative platform that engages students, faculty members, and staff at UWM with local communities, Milwaukee residents and multiple stakeholders to collectively examine cultural and environmental heritage. We do it through collecting, analyzing and disseminating stories of stewardship and cultural heritage in local neighborhoods. Using a series of digital platforms and techniques we make these stories available to the general public in quick and efficient ways. During this 5-week field school we hope to bring nationally renowned historians and experts to work with community members and students in documenting and interpreting the built and natural resources of this neighborhood.  We plan on using a unique method of data collection and analysis – a mix of environmental analysis, spatial mapping, oral history interpretation, ethnographic and observational studies, asset mapping, digital humanities, and archival research.  Through this method, we document neighborhood stories of identity, culture and architectural heritage, and everyday strategies of environmental stewardship practiced by residents of local communities in Milwaukee.  

Historic preservation, ecological stewardship, social justice, community based art practice and storytelling have one common thread. These are all about the "ethics of caring."  We don't usually think of "caring" when we talk about preservation and local history. Our fieldwork at BLC Field Schools explores grassroots knowledge and we examine everyday life of community members. Consequently, most discussions revolve around relationships and caring, not around policy and equity. Our research demonstrates that the extents of stewardship (caring) are proportionate to social power. For many home, neighborhood, environment, even the world came up as objects of caring. But we also meet people who could barely care for their own body, keep oneself healthy and happy. They could not afford to save the world even if they wanted to.

We argue that rethinking the way we think about preservation, by integrating values of environmental stewardship, civic engagement, and sustainable development into the discourse of historic preservation will require us to fundamentally reimagine the way we read architecture and the built environment.  This project is significant because of its unique methodology and its innovative rethinking of how we read the built environment. It is innovative because it focuses on integrating local knowledge with expert ways of reading the city and seeking to create a critically informed citizenry who can serve as advocates and stewards of our urban built heritage. 

At the end of this project we expect to produce a monograph listing stewardship strategies that complement more traditional approaches to historic preservation.  We plan to produce documentation and exhibits of places of cultural relevance using criteria suggested by the residents themselves.  We also expect to produce a series of 4-minute multi-media documentaries comparing, explaining and evaluating best stewardship practices and strategies found in each neighborhood.  

Weekly team meetings: Every Thursday 3:00 - 4:00 PM
Community Reviews: Fridays June 20, June 27, Thursday July 3

Readings to complete before the first day of classes
Introduction and Chapter 1, Thomas Carter and Elizabeth C. Cromley, Invitation to Vernacular Architecture: A Guide to the Study of Ordinary Buildings and Landscapes, (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2005).
Chapters 1-2, Thomas C. Hubka, Houses without Names: Architectural Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses, Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2013.

Schedule

Week 1 – Field measurements and Documentation

Directed by Jeffrey Klee, Architectural Historian, Colonial Williamsburg, Anna Andrzejewski, Associate Professor of Art History, UW Madison, Erin Dorbin, Hey Man Cool Digital History Productions, Arijit Sen, UWM

Monday June 9-Friday June 13, 2014
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM at Washington Park Partners Office, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave, Milwaukee, WI
June 13, 2014, CAD and Photography workshop, AUP194, 9 AM – 4:00 PM.
This week we will measure, draw, and document buildings and landscapes

Readings for this week:
Thomas Carter and Elizabeth C. Cromley, Invitation to Vernacular Architecture: A Guide to the Study of Ordinary Buildings and Landscapes, (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2005).
Thomas C. Hubka, Houses without Names: Architectural Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses, Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2013.

Week 2 – Oral Histories and Workshops

Directed by Michael Frisch, Professor of History and American Studies/ Senior Research Scholar, University at Buffalo, State University of New York and Principal, The Randforce Associates, LLC, Oral History and Multimedia Documentary, University at Buffalo Technology Incubator
Erin Dorbin, Hey Man Cool Digital History Productions, Arijit Sen, UWM


Monday June 16-Friday June 20, 2014
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM at Washington Park Partners Office, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave, Milwaukee, WI
This week we will interview, audio and video tape interactions with local residents
Friday June 20, 2014; 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Community reviews

Readings for this week:
Valerie Yow, Recording Oral History: A Guide for the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2nd ed. Walnut Creek, CA: Altimira Press, 2005
Michael H. Frisch, A Shared Authority: Essays on the Craft and Meaning of Oral and Public History, (New York: State University of New York Press, 1990)

If you need more tips on interviewing techniques please see, John Zeisel, Inquiry by Design: Environment/Behavior/Neuroscience in Architecture, Interiors, Landscape, and Planning, New York: WW Norton, 2006

Week 3 – Media and Archives

Directed by, Erin Dorbin, Hey Man Cool Digital History Productions, Arijit Sen, UWM
Photographs, Documentation and archival collections, Directed by Jasmine Alinder, Associate Professor, UWM History

Monday July 23 - Friday July 27, 2014
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM at Washington Park Partners Office, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave, Milwaukee, WI
This week we will collect, document, analyze and study collected photographs including historical photos. We will also begin work on creating a/v documentaries.
Friday June 27, 2014; 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Community reviews

Week 4 – Documentation and Reviews

Directed by Erin Dorbin, Hey Man Cool Digital History Productions, Arijit Sen, UWM
Monday June 30 - Thursday July 3
This week we will collect, document, analyze and study collected photographs including historical photos. There will be project reviews during this week.           
* Thursday July 3, 2014; 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Community reviews

Week 5 – Documentation and Reviews
Directed by Erin Dorbin, Hey Man Cool Digital History Productions, Arijit Sen, UWM
Monday July 7 - July 11
This week is dedicated to documentation and production of the final project documents.


Date of Event
Title of Event
Time
Building Rm. #
Type of event (Ex: book discussion session, film premiere)
June 2, 2014
Field School Informational meeting
9:00 AM-4:00 PM
School of Architecture and Urban Planning Room 183
Informational session for students, project participants and community.
June 9-13, 2014
Field School Week 1: Architectural and cultural landscape documentation; training workshops; fieldwork
9:00 AM-4:00 PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Documentation of Washington Park neighborhood; fieldwork in selected homes of local residents. This section of the field school will be directed by Arijit Sen and Jeff Klee, architectural historian from Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
June 13, 2014
Friday Community Event
Noon-4:00PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Community members, mentors, and Washington Park Partners members will review student work and projects
June 16-20, 2014
Field School Week 2: Community Storytelling workshop, mock interview workshop; oral history interview methods, digital techniques,
Introduction to field recording and operating equipment: Zoom H2
9:00 AM-4:00 PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
 Workshops at the Washington Park Partners office for field school students and community participants; oral history interview with neighborhood residents at their homes. Arijit Sen, Michael Frisch, and Erin Dorbin will direct this part of the field school.
June 20, 2014
Friday Community Event
Noon-4:00PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Community members, mentors, and Washington Park Partners members will review student work and projects
June 18, 2014
Community Story telling event, Washington Park Partners Safety committee meeting
Noon-4:00 PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
This interviewing and story telling event commences after the WPP safety committee meeting that many residents attend. These residents will be informed of the storytelling workshop in advance.
June 23-27, 2014
Field School Week 3: Multimedia and documentary making workshops
Introduction to audio editing using Reaper software (free download/shareware)

9:00 AM-4:00 PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Workshops at the Washington Park Partners office for field school students and community participants. This part of the field school will be directed by Erin Dorbin and Arijit Sen.
June 27, 2014
Friday Community Event
Noon-4:00PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Community members, mentors, and Washington Park Partners members will review student work and projects
June 24, 2014
Archival analysis and historical photograph analysis workshop
Noon-3PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Workshop directed by Dr. Jasmine Alinder
June 30-July 3, 2014
Field School Week 4: Website production and onsite work
Group critiques of student documentaries and open workshops for individual instruction/group questions related to documentary process/audio editing
9:00AM-4:00PM
School of Architecture and Urban Planning Room 191
Website production and final exhibit
Arijit Sen and Erin Dorbin
July 7-July 11, 2014
Field School Week 5: Website production and onsite work,
Group critiques of student documentaries and open workshops for individual instruction/group questions related to documentary process/audio editing
9:00 AM-4:00 PM
School of Architecture and Urban Planning Room 191
Website production and final exhibit
Arijit Sen and Erin Dorbin
July 25, 2014
Field School Final Exhibition
5:00 – 9:00 PM
Washington Park Partners Conference Room, 3940 W. Lisbon Ave
Neighborhood Event; installation of website and exhibit

Final Exhibition Day: July 25, 2014, 4-8 PM

Grades
20% Participation, regular attendance, completing assigned readings, intellectual curiosity, taking intellectual risks, suspending disbelief and trying out ideas that are different
30% Competence in the field
50% Quality of work and final product

University policies           
In this course, university policies and procedures will be followed for academic misconduct, accommodation for disability and religious observation, discriminatory conduct, sexual harassment, and other matters.
The university has a responsibility to promote academic honesty and integrity and to develop procedures to deal effectively with instances of academic dishonesty.  Students are responsible for the honest completion and representation of their work, for the appropriate citation of sources, and for respect of others' academic endeavors. Please familiarize yourself with University Plagiarism policy.
A student may appeal a grade on the grounds that it is based on a capricious or arbitrary decision of the course instructor.  Such an appeal shall follow the established procedures adopted by the department and school.  These procedures are available in writing from the department chair.
If you need special accommodations in order to meet any of the requirements of this course, please contact the instructor as soon as possible. Also, please see the instructor if you anticipate a conflict in attending a class because of a religious observation. Sexual harassment, bigotry towards race, class or sexual orientation will not be tolerated. It subverts the university's mission and threatens the careers, educational experience, and well being of students, faculty and staff.

Bibliography and Resources
Dell Upton, Architecture in the United States, New York: Oxford University Press, 1998 Pierce Lewis,
Grady Clay, Real Places: An Unconventional Guide to America's Generic Landscape, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Landscape in Sight: Looking at America, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977).
James A Holstein and Jaber F. Gubrium, Varieties of Narrative Analysis, (Los Angeles: SAGE, 2012)
John Stilgoe, “Landschaft and Linearity,” Environmental Review ER 4:1 (1980): 2-17
James A Holstein and Jaber F. Gubrium, Varieties of Narrative Analysis, (Los Angeles: SAGE, 2012)
John Stilgoe, Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness of Everyday Places, (New York: Walker and Company, 1998). ($9.39)
John Zeisel, Inquiry by Design: Environment/Behavior/Neuroscience in Architecture, Interiors, Landscape, and Planning, New York: WW Norton, 2006 – D2L, On Reserve
Michael H. Frisch, A Shared Authority: Essays on the Craft and Meaning of Oral and Public History, (New York: State University of New York Press, 1990)
Ronald Grele, Envelopes of Sound: The Art of Oral History, 2nd ed. New York: Praeger, 1991 – D2L
Thomas Carter and Elizabeth C. Cromley, Invitation to Vernacular Architecture: A Guide to the Study of Ordinary Buildings and Landscapes, Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2005 – Class Text. One per group will do
Valerie Yow. Recording Oral History: A Guide for the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2nd ed. Walnut Creek, CA: Altimira Press, 2005. ($18.00 - 30.00)

Websites and resources

Oral History sites
http://www.commonground.org/
http://www.exfabula.com/
http://www.jasonohler.com/storytelling/storymaking.cfm
http://www.portalwisconsin.org/sidewalkstories.cfm
http://www.streetstories.net/
http://www.streetside.org/about/index.htm
http://www.mungos.org/streetstories
http://storytelling.concordia.ca/
http://www.hurricanearchive.org/object/3796

Place Based Story Telling and sites
http://www.communograph.com/
http://www.neptuneseven.com/testing/uwm/
http://www.cityofmemory.org/map/index.php
http://www.placematters.net/
http://www.preservationnation.org/take-action/this-place-matters/
http://placeandmemory.org/index.php?title=Main_Page
http://www.preservation.lacity.org/survey
http://subway-life.com/

Maps and Urban Tours Sites
http://dublincore.org/specifications/
http://www.petapixel.com/2010/05/24/museum-of-london-releases-augmented-reality-app-for-historical-photos/
http://nolayouth.org/
http://oilspill.labucketbrigade.org/
http://download.ushahidi.com/
https://womenundersiegesyria.crowdmap.com/
http://acl.arts.usyd.edu.au/harlem/
http://digitalharlemblog.wordpress.com/digital-harlem-the-site/the-map/
http://www.writingtheearth.com/search/label/architecture

Online Museums
http://www.magiccarpet.hk/saiyingpun/#en_grid
http://www.floridamemory.com/
http://viewshare.org/embed-and-share/
http://publications.newberry.org/lincoln/
http://www.historypin.com/
http://wisconsinheritage.org/
http://viewshare.org/
http://clevelandhistorical.org/
http://chicagohistory.org/planavisit/exhibitions
http://mobile.mallhistory.us/